History in the Works at the Baltimore Museum of Industry

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Whenever we experience new places and adventures in the area, it’s always my intention to post about them in a somewhat timely manner to share on KFDC. But sometimes life gets busy, and I procrastinate, then forget…then remember many months later.

That’s just what happened with the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Owen and I visited the Charm City attraction back in January (hence, the snow you might see in some photos) and I mentioned it in a Weekdays post shortly after, but never got around to a full write-up. I recalled it recently as I was thinking about good places to go on really hot or rainy summer days, and Baltimore came to mind, since the city boasts several places that fit the bill — Port Discovery, Maryland Science Center, and the American Visionary Art Museum among them. And with that recollection, voilà!, the Baltimore Museum of Industry was back on my “To-Post” list and, now, here.

The exhibits begin before you even walk in

The exhibits begin before you even walk in

The Inner Harbor museum is an interesting time trip through Baltimore’s early business days, highlighting the trades and people that helped build the port city through exhibits that showcase relics from the past and recreate various industry environments. Several permanent exhibits are set up just as the real businesses would have been when they existed, giving visitors a fascinating glimpse at life during that time period.

Checking out the cannery

Checking out the cannery

Sew cool

Sew cool

The Cannery is a replication of Platt & Company, which actually existed in the building that now houses the museum, and takes you through the canning process with real equipment and panels explaining it on display. The Garment Loft, containing many tables with old sewing machines, shows how clothes used to be made. In the Print Shop, museum staff demoed an old printing press, and we examined printing letters in various sizes. The Machine Shop is quite compelling to view, full of tools and apparatuses that you just don’t see anymore. An exhibit of vintage automobiles, including a case of old car radios, captured Owen’s attention for awhile. There is also a Pharmacy and Diner that look straight out of the old days. And a great feature of all of these exhibits are hands-on areas with toys, where kids can do activities that relate to what they are seeing.

Printing has come a long way

Printing has come a long way

A close look at the letters to print

A close look at the letters to print

Gadgets galore in the Machine Shop

Gadgets galore in the Machine Shop

More interesting displays about stand-out Baltimore people, places, and things are located throughout the museum. Who knew the oversized tennis racket and aluminum skis were invented there? And Video Game Wizard, a temporary exhibit about the video game industry and the various jobs it takes to create a game shows that Baltimore is progressing with times and also offers an opportunity for some digital interaction.

Who knew?

Who knew?

No Spotify here...

No Spotify here…

Learning what it takes to create a video game

Learning what it takes to create a video game

The building itself is interesting to view, beginning with old equipment outside to cool features around the space to a wall of windows offering stunning views of the Inner Harbor. You can take a tour of it all — a guided walk among the exhibits and more is all included in the admission price — or explore on your own like we did. Either way, it’s a fun and engaging outing for all ages.

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Get the scoop on Old Bay!

Get the scoop on Old Bay!

The Baltimore Museum of Industry is located at 1415 Key Highway at the Inner Harbor. Hours are 10am – 4pm Tuesday – Sunday. Admission is $12/adult, $7/ages 7-12, free for 6 and under. Before you go, search for a deal on Groupon, LivingSocial, or Certifikid, as they often have admission discounts available.

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Filed under All ages, Educational, Exhibit, Maryland, Museums, Weekdays, Weekend

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